Same Sun Here

French Translation of “same here!” | The official Collins English-French Dictionary online. Over , French translations of English words and phrases.

The part written from River's perspective was written by Silas House who is a native of Kentucky, and the part written from Meen'as perspective was written by Neela Vaswani, who is of Indian heritage, but currently lives in New York City. Often I feel like New York is either idealized or criminalized in stories. Same here is another phrase that is very common in conversation, and is used to confirm that you have had the same experience as the speaker:.


French Translation of “same here!” | The official Collins English-French Dictionary online. Over , French translations of English words and phrases.
90% of the time, speakers of English use just 7, words in speech and writing. These words appear in red, and are graded with stars. One-star words are frequent, two-star words are more frequent, and three-star words are the most frequent.
The Same Sun Here by Silas House and Neela Vaswani is a novel that consists of letters between two middle school pen pals, River Dean Justice and Meena Joshi. River is a boy living in the mountains of Kentucky while Meena is an immigrant from India living in Chinatown in New York/5.
The Same Sun Here by Silas House and Neela Vaswani is a novel that consists of letters between two middle school pen pals, River Dean Justice and Meena Joshi. River is a boy living in the mountains of Kentucky while Meena is an immigrant from India living in Chinatown in New York/5.


And the writing is solid, even if I don't think the characters' voices are terribly realistic for their age. Would normally give this book 3 stars thanks to the writing, but I can't ignore my own personal dislike for the book in my rating.

View all 3 comments. Apr 16, The Rusty Key rated it it was amazing. Reviewed by Jordan B. Both boys and girls ages 10 and Up for discussion of racism, troubled family life and general maturity of themes. The narrative is split between a male and female character making it relatable to either gender. Same Sun Here by Silas House and Neela Vaswani is like a blast of air conditioning from an open door on a baking hot Manhattan day, at once refreshing, relieving, sweet and enlivening.

With easy, commanding authori Reviewed by Jordan B. With easy, commanding authority the authors wholly embody the voices of their two characters, far-flung pen pals River and Meena, delivering a story that wrenches the reader with its honesty, clarity and verve. Told as a series of letters, and a few emails, Same Sun Here is the story of two utterly different lives joined by a common spirit and a class project. Though he adores his Mawmaw, River longs for the time when his family was whole and everyone was happy.

Thousands of miles north in New York City, Meena Joshi is an Indian immigrant squatting in a one-bedroom apartment with her parents and brother in Chinatown.

With the historic election of Barack Obama ahead of them, conversations about race seem to touch everyone, particularly Meena and River. Through their letters, which span the course of ten months, we learn of both the large and small-scale problems that are shaping each of their worlds. In New York, Meena and her parents are applying for American citizenship.

Though excited by the opportunities that her new country has to offer, Meena is homesick for her lush town in India, and for her grandmother who was left behind. At every turn the culture of America seems to reject her, as ignorant strangers accuse her of being a terrorist, and the hovering landlord applies cruel tactics to push her and her neighbors out of their rent controlled apartments.

Even at home Meena feels out of place as she begins to question how her parents could have just left her in India for so many years. As dramatic and fascinatingly nuanced as those plot points are, the heart of the story and what makes Same Sun Here so successful is the relationship that develops between River and Meena. Against this socio-political backdrop, they are just two kids trying to figure it all out. Each feels like an outsider in their own way, but through their letters they find commonality in their shared curiosity about one another and the world around them.

There is a naïve purity to their interactions that is truly beautiful to experience as they question and learn from one another, free from judgment. Well, nearly free from judgment. Meena does attempt to tell River about the first time she shaved her legs which River was none to thrilled to read about, a segment that elicits some good laughs.

As letters, the story is obviously written in the first person, alternating between the two perspectives and the authors must be commended for the voicing of the two characters, which are richly real and never falter. These feel like letters from children, full of poor grammar and slang and the kind of well-meaning bluntness you can only find in people of this age. An instant entrant into our Golden Key Collection, Same Sun Here is a celebration of our diversity and the human capacity to find commonality over any divide.

For more reviews, author interviews, reading lists, and feature articles from The Rusty Key, visit us at www. Sweet and heartwarming while delivering several important messages.

Two twelve-year-olds bridge their very different worlds as pen pals: It's categorized as a middle school book but older teens and adults will like it as well.

I thoroughly enjoyed it. Apr 17, Teresa rated it really liked it Shelves: This is an adorable little epistolary novel, and a quick read. I can't remember who recommended this little middle grade novel probably Book Riot but I'm glad I picked it up. Jun 21, Alex not a dude Baugh rated it really liked it Shelves: As Meena's family studies for citizenship exams and River's town faces devastating mountaintop removal, this unlikely pair become pen pals, sharing thoughts and, as their camaraderie deepens, discovering common ground From the publisher: As Meena's family studies for citizenship exams and River's town faces devastating mountaintop removal, this unlikely pair become pen pals, sharing thoughts and, as their camaraderie deepens, discovering common ground in their disparate experiences.

In this extraordinary novel in two voices, an Indian immigrant girl in New York City and a Kentucky coal miner's son find strength and perspective by sharing their true selves across the miles. In a world that has become suspicious of those who don't look like ourselves, Same Sun Here is a refreshing look at what can be - that as we get to know other, who were are inside takes precedence over what we look like.

What an important lesson Meena and River teach us. Written in epistolary form, the novel enables the to experience these two different characters simultaneously, as they get to know and trust each other.

Here are two kids, both of whom do not have personal computers at their disposal, which alone tells something of their economic circumstances, and they must rely on good old fashion letter writing, at least most of the time. They do resort to email exchanged from a school and public library computer as the story progresses and their lives head in crisis mode.

Right from the start, pen-pals Meena and River agree to be their own true self with each other in their letters. As they write back and forth, and get to know each other better, this agreement sometimes leads to arguments, soul-bearing and the start of a deepening friendship. And eventually, Meena and River are comfortable enough with each other to reveal their inner most thoughts, hopes, dreams and fears in their letters, thing that they may never have said face to face to anyone else.

The letter writing format allows the kids to cover a diverse number of topics, including economic hardship, political decisions, and bigotry and to talk about the direct impact they have on the lives of Meena and River's families. And it allows for an exploration of cultural differences in a very frank, but sensitive way.

As each child reveals more and more about their life, they are able to give each other the emotional support they both need so badly during what turns out to be such a transitional year for both of them. Same Sun Here is a well-written novel. The language is clear and age appropriate, the characters well-developed and believable. Unfamiliar terms that are specific to their different lives are defined in the course of the letters, so the reader never has to wonder what, for instance, mountaintop removal is and why it puts people out of work.

I felt a special connection to and understanding of this book thanks to authors Silas House and Neela Vaswani. On the one hand, like Meena, I grew up in NYC and recognize some of the things she faced in the novel, like rent control and greedy landlords. On the other hand, Silas House is an associate professor at Berea College. My Baugh family comes from Berea and more than one of them graduated from Beara College. So, aside that it is such a well done story, how could I not love this book? I am sincerely hoping there will be a sequel to Same Sun Here.

I would really like to find out what happens to Meena and River next. Same Sun Here is an enjoyable book to read. I felt like I was part of a long distance conversation between two middle schoolers. The two children are pen pals--one a girl named Meena, the other a boy named River. Meena is originally from India, but is living in a rent-controlled apartment in New York. River is a boy who lives in Kentucky in the Appalachian Mountains by mining country.

The children write back and forth--each chapter is a new letter from one of them. They occasionally email one an Same Sun Here is an enjoyable book to read. They occasionally email one another or write a postcard or two, but most of the correspondence is old-fashioned snail mail--a lost form of art, I think. It's interesting to get the students' perspectives on their lives in America.

Many things parallel one another, but many things are completely different. One thing they have in common is that both of their fathers have to work at jobs that are far away from the family homes. They only see their dads on occasional visits. Meena and River agree to always tell one another the truth and to keep one another's secrets. It's very endearing that they call one another "best friend," even though they've never met face-to-face. Same Sun Here is an authentic piece.

The part written from River's perspective was written by Silas House who is a native of Kentucky, and the part written from Meen'as perspective was written by Neela Vaswani, who is of Indian heritage, but currently lives in New York City. The wonderful details of the children's lives is genuine because the authors share the characters' backgrounds and experiences.

These two authors worked well together to make a book that causes the reader to reflect on issues of race, ethnicity, and even preserving our environment. Jun 17, The Reading Countess rated it it was amazing Shelves: Beautifully written epistolary book told spot-on in two voices.

Two kids with seemingly nothing in common discover throughout the course of a year that their sun is the same. Reviews place this book in kids' hands beginning in fourth grade, but I'm not sure. The shaving, the bit about a boy vs. I'm searching for a handful of books that might lend themselves to rich discussion in lit. As an aside, while I love h Beautifully written epistolary book told spot-on in two voices.

As an aside, while I love how authors put book titles in their own books, if it happens so much it begins to feel too purposeful. Lastly, can I just say how much I adore Silas House's writing? Eli the Goodgo read it. I like that library books have secret lives. All those hands that have held them.

All those eyes that have read them. May 31, Graham Oliver rated it really liked it Shelves: Mar 24, Katie Fitzgerald rated it really liked it Shelves: This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom. Longer Letter Later, Same Sun Here is an epistolary novel set in , which is told entirely in correspondence between two randomly assigned pen pals - Meena, an Indian immigrant living in New York City, and River, who lives in Kentucky, where his father is a coal miner. Though different in many ways, Meena and River find that living beneath the same sun gives them lots in common - including their love for thei This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom.

Though different in many ways, Meena and River find that living beneath the same sun gives them lots in common - including their love for their grandmothers, their love of writing, and their willingness to open their lives to one another. Ultimately, though they never meet face to face in the book, the two become best friends, demonstrating the ideal that our differences can bring us together rather than keep us apart. For the most part, reading this book was really enjoyable. I have always loved stories told through documents and letters, and I like the deep level of character development that comes from this format.

The characters know nothing about each other, so every letter gives a little more insight into their unique personalities, which helps the reader get to know them, too. I also learned a lot about immigrant culture in New York, rent control, mountaintop removal, Appalachian culture, and Indian language, food, and customs. My criticism, though, is that this happens too easily. Meena and River are at times irritatingly good kids, whose minds are always open, and whose every mistake is immediately corrected.

I also had a hard time understanding why they thought of each other as best friends so quickly. Instead, that close friendship came on suddenly, and the deeper level of understanding came later on. That just seemed somehow backward to me. The value of the story, though, is that it undermines the instant gratification of modern technology and argues for the relevance of writing meaningful messages to one another and waiting anxiously for the replies. Despite these flaws, though, I think the book is very thought-provoking and will start up a lot of wonderful conversations for classes, book clubs, and families who read it as a group.

Aug 09, Stephanie Cox rated it it was amazing. Silas House is one of my favorite authors. This man can write! I loved this YA story of two kids who become pen pals.

River and Meena have very different lives but they also discover they have a lot in common. Just a lovely story. Give it a read! Jan 22, Jennifer rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is a beautifully written epistolary YA novel that sheds light on what it is like to be an immigrant AND what life is like for white middle America. Mee Mee is an undocumented immigrant living illegally in a rent controlled Chinatown NYC apartment, and River is a Kentucky coal miner's son.

Through their brutally honest letters they pledge to be their "own true selves" with one another , they learn that they are not as different as they might first seem to be. They both adore their grandmoth This is a beautifully written epistolary YA novel that sheds light on what it is like to be an immigrant AND what life is like for white middle America.

They both adore their grandmothers. They both have absent fathers--River's must work in Biloxi and spend weeks away from his family, and Mee Mee's works for a NJ catering company and returns one weekend a month.

Both live fearful of losing their homes. They share their stories of neighbors, favorite books A Tree Grows in Brooklyn , illness, and tragedy Dadi's death and a rock slide. River becomes "famous" for participating in an MTR protest and the book ends with anticipation of the 2 friends finally meeting in NYC. I just loved the sensitivity apparent in each character's story. The 2 authors worked well together to bring 2 apparently disparate characters on even ground so that their similarities shine and their differences are diminished.

Read this for PS book group and buying a copy for my classroom shelf. Jan 24, Abby Johnson rated it it was amazing. When New Yorker Meena and Kentucky boy River sign up for a pen pal program, they have no idea that they're each finding a kindred spirit. Who would have thought that two year-olds from such different backgrounds could have so much in common? Meena was born in India and moved to New York City to be with her family when she was nine. River has lived in a tiny town in Eastern Kentucky his entire life.

As the two write letters back and forth, they discover that they share a love of mountains, the When New Yorker Meena and Kentucky boy River sign up for a pen pal program, they have no idea that they're each finding a kindred spirit.

As the two write letters back and forth, they discover that they share a love of mountains, they both have a special relationship with their grandmothers, and there are political issues in their hometowns that could have disastrous effects on both of them. Neela Vaswani and Silas House create two characters that have strong, identifiable voices.

I loved getting to know these kids as they wrote back and forth to each other. The book explores some political issues affecting both protagonists - River is dealing with mountaintop removal by big coal companies and Meena is constantly afraid of being evicted since her family illegally sublets a rent-controlled apartment. Both of these issues are approached in a kid-friendly way.

Both Meena and River face discrimination because of the way they look and talk. This is a great book for tweens, one with a lot of heart. Sep 10, Stephanie Fatemi rated it really liked it. River is a boy living in the mountains of Kentucky while Meena is an immigrant from India living in Chinatown in New York. While they come from very different backgrounds, they are able to become close friends through their writing.

They each face their own kind of prejudice in their lives River for being from the Kentucky hills and Meena for being an immigrant in a new country and they realize that they may not be so different after all. This novel shows the hardships in each of their lives, and demonstrates how they are able to face their problems with courage and realize that everyone sees the same sun no matter where they are.

I like that this book is written as a series of letters between River and Meena and tells both points of view. I also thought that the authors made River and Meena very authentic and looking at the back cover, realized that the authors themselves are closely related to the character they were writing House is from Kentucky and Vaswani is in New York.

Jan 25, Pam Torres rated it really liked it. The first thing I noticed immediately was the voice and it isn't a Young Adult voice at all. River and Meena are definitely Tweens. A distictive voice is a common thread in the middle grade fiction that I'm attracted to.

There's also a strong sense of place and time. Both writers create their worlds through words in letters, an art that many of our middle grade students are losing to the brevity of text and email. The contrast of the Appalachian rural and Indian urban worlds creates a wonderful The first thing I noticed immediately was the voice and it isn't a Young Adult voice at all. The contrast of the Appalachian rural and Indian urban worlds creates a wonderful place where they come together and construct their own safe place.

The characters are dealing with family, school and locational issues that are relevant providing a wealth of fodder for educators. The format of the letter appealed to my interest in research and primary sources to create an accurate picture of real people. I see this as an enjoyable read aloud for most Tweens and a great read for middle graders.

See my full review here: If you liked this book, you might also enjoy: Aug 31, Anna rated it it was ok Shelves: A delightful little tale in accepting differences, this book follows the lives of two young teens and their hardships and celebrations.

I felt that it was a bit forced, and the characters too far-fetched, with its attempt, and somewhat success, at fitting every "alternative" aspect of life in the few pages. While I enjoyed it, I probably would not recommend it to students or adult friends, mainly for that reason. May 14, Edward Sullivan rated it really liked it Shelves: It's hard to imagine kids being pen pals these days but they both seem to enjoy exchanging lengthy letters with one another. This story grew on me. The main characters are interesting and the voices are unique.

The people in the girl's life are more vividly realized. There's lots in this story to discuss. A good book for class or small group reading. Dec 19, John rated it really liked it Shelves: Same Sun Here is a thought-provoking novel that will lead to amazing discussions about the environment, immigrants, unlikely friendships, politics, and so much more.

I'm having a difficult time "assigning" it an interest level. Maybe grades 6 and up? Maybe grades 7 and up? Test your vocabulary with our question quiz! Definition of same here.

Learn More about same here. Resources for same here Time Traveler! Explore the year a word first appeared. Dictionary Entries near same here same again same as usual same difference same here samekh samel samely.

Statistics for same here Look-up Popularity. Comments on same here What made you want to look up same here? Get Word of the Day daily email! Need even more definitions? Something to Remember the Moment If you need a reminder. Ghost Word The story of an imaginary word that managed to sneak past our editors and enter the dictionary. Literally How to use a word that literally drives some people nuts.

Same here definition is - —used to say that one thinks, feels, or wants the same thing as someone else. How to use same here in a sentence. —used to say that one thinks, feels, or wants the same . Also, the same with downiloadojg.gq too, I agree, as in I think she was lying all along.-Same here, or I couldn't sleep because of the noise.-The same with downiloadojg.gq first phrase is also used in an order for food or drink to indicate one wants the same thing as the previous person ordering; for example, One more beer, please.-Same here.[Colloquial; late s]. You, too and same here have different meanings depending on the context, but they generally appear in informal or spoken English to answer a wish or confirm an experience. You, too has two primary uses, and the meaning of the phrase depends quite a bit on punctuation.